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Discover the world's first concrete that captures carbon using industrial waste, reducing cement by half and without water. Revolutionizing construction!

15 May 2024 to 19: 10
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construction - carbon - concrete - civil construction - carbon emissions
Revolution in construction! CO2-SUICOM captures carbon and reduces emissions. Discover how this innovative concrete is changing the industry for the better!

Revolution in construction! CO2-SUICOM captures carbon and reduces emissions. Discover how this innovative concrete is changing the industry for the better!

CO2-SUICOM is the world's first concrete that captures carbon. Each mix reduces the amount of regular cement used by more than half, which significantly reduces emissions of the production process in construction. New concrete can be manufactured directly on site in construction industries.

CO2-SUICOM concrete, a pioneering development worldwide, revolutionized the construction industry by capturing carbon during its production process. This innovative material reduces the use of traditional cement by half, significantly reducing the emissions generated. Furthermore, its preparation can be carried out directly in industrial facilities.

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According to market analysts, the concrete materials market is expected to reach $364 billion by 2028, driven by advancing urbanization and increased infrastructure development activities in construction. Instead of eliminating the use of concrete, a collaboration between Kajima, The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Denka and Landes Co. brought to life CO2-SUICOM, the first carbon-capturing concrete for construction.

Innovative Process

CO2-SUICOM uses industrial waste instead of traditional cement. Each mix reduces the amount of cement used by more than 50%, which results in a significant reduction in emissions generated in the production process. Furthermore, instead of water, CO2-SUICOM uses carbon dioxide as a mixing agent, allowing it to capture CO2 until the concrete is completely hardened.

Direct On-Site Carbon Capture in Construction

This innovative concrete can be produced directly at industrial construction sites, channeling carbon dioxide emissions and other exhaust gases into a mixing chamber rather than releasing them into the air. As the materials react with carbon dioxide, the concrete hardens, trapping the emissions within itself.

Environmental impact

The standard concrete manufacturing process produces around 288 kilograms of carbon emissions per cubic meter. In contrast, CO2-SUICOM captures 18 kilograms of carbon per cubic meter, surpassing the concept of net zero emissions. The Japanese government has included CO2-SUICOM in its strategy for carbon neutrality by 2050.

Emissions Reduction with CO2-SUICOM

Typically, concrete hardens by a chemical reaction between cement and water. However, CO2-SUICOM replaces more than half of the cement with γ-C2S, a material that reacts with carbon dioxide in the air to harden. In construction facilities such as thermal power plants, carbon-rich gases are diverted to a capture chamber where concrete made with CO2-SUICOM traps the carbon dioxide.

O manufacturing process CO2-SUICOM generates 197 kilograms less carbon emissions per cubic meter compared to traditional concrete, as it replaces cement with industrial by-products. Furthermore, concrete can capture 109 kilograms of carbon dioxide per cubic meter, resulting in a total reduction of 306 kilograms of emissions per cubic meter, achieving negative emissions of -18 kilograms.

Outlook for the Future

Japan consumes 91 million cubic meters of concrete annually. Replacing this amount with CO2-SUICOM would reduce 27,84 million tons of carbon emissions, equivalent to a third of the annual carbon dioxide capture from Japanese forests. Of this total, 1,64 million tons would come from concrete's ability to be carbon negative, capturing more carbon than it emits.

Source: www.kajima.co.jp

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