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Mineral 10 times stronger than the powerful Graphene revealed: New protagonist emerges to revolutionize mining and the electronics manufacturing industry in the world

Written by Flavia Marinho
Published 26/05/2024 às 10:14
graphene - boron nitride - gold - electronic - philosopher's stone - adamantium
Revolution in mining: 'it went bad' for graphene. The unsung hero's revolutionary discovery, boron nitride, is about to transform industry worldwide!

Revolution in mining: 'it went bad' for graphene. The unsung hero's revolutionary discovery, boron nitride, is about to transform industry worldwide!

There is a silent revolution happening in the world of materials, and the Rice University, in the USA, broke century-old paradigms. Pathfinder scientists have revealed an extraordinary discovery: a material that defies expectations by being ten times more resistant than the powerful graphene. This unsung hero goes by the name hexagonal boron nitride.

Both share the intriguing hexagonal structure, but this is where the stories diverge. Each hexagon of the graphene it's composed by carbon atoms, which enchanted the scientific community, but revealed its fragility when subjected to extreme situations. In contrast, the boron nitride hexagonal, displays in its intriguing composition three atoms of boron and three of nitrogen. This subtle atomic dance proves crucial to a surprisingly unique resistance to cracking, challenging established concepts.

Scientists discover adamantium??

Measuring forces beyond limits: The battle between the powerful Graphene and the surprising mechanical superiority of Boron Nitride

In a duel of forces, the graphene and boron nitride hexagonal face each other in the resistance ring. Surprisingly, the champion is not what we expected. While graphene boasts a strength of 130 gigapascals and an elasticity of 1 terapascal, hexagonal boron nitride, despite its apparently lower ratings, turns out to be about ten times more robust in laboratory tests. The physics behind this phenomenon challenges the theory established by Griffith in 1921.

The real revolution lies in the trajectory of the cracks. While the graphene It allows predictable and linear movements, for example, when it encounters a crack, it follows a zigzag dance straight through its hexagonal structure. However, the boron nitride has a unique cunning. Due to the contrasting tensions between the boron and nitrogen, its cracks dance bifurcated, following intricate paths from one end to the other. This unique behavior provides extraordinary resistance, defying the traditional laws of fracture mechanics.

Bifurcated cracks in hexagonal boron nitride (Image: Reproduction/Nature)
Bifurcated cracks in hexagonal boron nitride (Image: Reproduction/Nature)

From the laboratory to the world: Hexagonal Boron Nitride as a replacement for Graphene

The stage is set for a revolution in 2D materials. Hexagonal boron nitride, more resistant and malleable than graphene, emerges as the ideal protagonist for the manufacture of electronic fabrics, smart adhesives and even advanced medical implants, positioning it as an efficient alternative for innovation and large-scale production.

Its heat resistance and chemical stability open doors for precision electronic applications and low energy consumption. The future looks bright for boron nitride, and researchers are eager to prove its advantages beyond the confines of the laboratory.

The journey of hexagonal boron nitride is far from over in the confines of the laboratory. Researchers are determined to bring this hero material to the world stage by testing it on real devices. The vision is clear: make the boron nitride a not only viable but superior alternative to graphene in large-scale applications.

This is an invitation to witness the rise of a new materials champion, shaping the future of technology and innovation, where science challenges the status quo and promises to transform the nanotechnology landscape and open doors to revolutionary applications in diverse areas of industry.

Source: Nature

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Flavia Marinho

Flavia Marinho is a Production Engineer with a postgraduate degree in Electrical and Automation Engineering, with extensive experience in the onshore and offshore shipbuilding industry. In recent years, she has dedicated herself to writing articles for news websites in the areas of industry, oil and gas, energy, shipbuilding, geopolitics, jobs and courses, with more than 7 thousand articles published. Contact us to suggest an agenda, advertise job vacancies or advertise on our portal.

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