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The history and evolution of the Volkswagen Kombi: the beautiful van that had its trajectory ended because of one factor

Written by Bruno Teles
Published 21/05/2024 às 14:57
The history and evolution of the Volkswagen Kombi: the beautiful van that had its trajectory ended because of one factor
Photo: Volkswagen/Disclosure

The Volkswagen Kombi, known for its versatility and charm, has had a remarkable trajectory in the automotive industry, especially in Brazil. This iconic van, which went through several versions and improvements over the decades, ended its production due to new safety requirements that its structure could not support.

The Volkswagen Kombi, known for its versatility and charm, has had a remarkable trajectory in the automotive industry, especially in Brazil. This iconic van ended its production due to new requirements of security that its structure could not support.

The Volkswagen Kombi began its history in Germany in 1950, as a utility vehicle based on the Beetle chassis. It was designed by Dutch importer Ben Pon, who saw potential in a transport model within the Volkswagen factory. The first Kombi prototype had poor aerodynamics, but after three years of adjustments, the Kombi was launched as the Type 2.

Kombi arrived in 1950 through the importer Bras Motor, before Volkswagen established its own factory

In Brazil, the Kombi arrived in 1950 through importer BrasMotor, before Volkswagen established its own factory. The van quickly stood out for its load capacity and mechanical reliability, conquering the national market.

Over the decades, the Kombi has undergone several restylings and mechanical improvements. In 1957, the Kombi began to be manufactured in Brazil with 50% national parts. In 1976, the van received a significant restyling, gaining a more modern look with a unique windshield and new lights. In 1981, the rare diesel version appeared, which faced problems due to the engine overheating.

In 2013, the last special series, Last Edition, was released to celebrate the end of production

The 2000s marked the end of production of the Kombi with an air-cooled boxer engine. In 2005, Volkswagen launched the Silver Series Kombi to mark the end of this era. In 2013, the last special series, Last Edition, was released to celebrate the end of production.

The Kombi's trajectory was terminated because the vehicle could not be adapted to comply with new legislation safety measures that required airbags and ABS brakes. Thus, production was officially closed, leaving a legacy of nostalgia and functionality in the memories of many. The Volkswagen Kombi, with its various versions and innovations, continues to be an automotive icon, remembered for its robustness, low maintenance costs and excellent load capacity.

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Bruno Teles

I talk about technology, innovation, oil and gas. I update daily about opportunities in the Brazilian market. Agenda suggestion? Send it to brunotelesredator@gmail.com

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